DOUBLE BREASTED: GOT BELLY?

IMG_0119

Got belly? Maybe no belly, or perhaps a little bit of belly.

The always elegant double breasted jacket is not coming back in style, because quite frankly it has never gone out of style, and never will. Stunning in the 1920’s and 30’s, sometimes crude in the 40’s and 50’s, and almost nonexistent in the 60’s. There were some cool examples in the 70’s, and for the most part it was slaughtered in the 80’s with enough shoulder padding to take out any wide receiver running a slant, and button stances low enough to leave buttoned and still be able to relieve one’s self.

Gorgeous double breasted jackets to the true gentleman were always proper, regardless of the decade. The keys to a successful double breast are not terribly varied. There is a ratio of balance and proportion, and this ethos holds true for any physique.

The peak should be high, but not bordering the shoulder line like even some of the better off the peg suits have donned in recent seasons. Too low a peak is inelegant and creates other issues. Too low, there is no opportunity for the lapel to have proper roll, and to have any belly or lack of belly.

Belly refers to the curvature of the lapels outer edges. The consideration of belly, or lack there of comes down to aesthetic preference, determining house style of the particular tailor which in essence comes down to where you are bespeaking the jacket. Anderson & Sheppard as well as A. Caraceni are tailors with distinct double breasted models. Plenty of belly on their respective lapels that have remained generally unchanged.

The problem with many bespoke or custom tailors is that they can be quite generic in terms of executing a double breasted jacket. There is the standard milk white fare that is banal and for the most part wears the man, not the other way around.

These are varied group spanning 60 years. With the exception of the first jacket which has slightly more padding at the shoulder. The remarkable thing is that all the other examples have zero or virtually zero padding at the shoulder, regardless of the year they were made .

IMG_0102

E. Baruffa Milano, 1930’s. Hard English flannel in midnight navy with natural pinstripe. Six on two with jetted pockets and non-vented.

IMG_0117

 

 

IMG_0139

Lesley & Roberts London,1957. Lightweight mohair silk grosgrain lapels. Four on one with jetted pockets and non-vented.

IMG_0145

IMG_0142

IMG_0204

J.C. Wells London, 1971. Lightweight worsted in black with lilac chalk stripe. Six on two with flap pocket and side vents.

IMG_0205

IMG_0207

IMG_0021

J.C. Wells London, 1976. Four on two, jetted pockets and side vents. Tropical weight wool in light gray.

IMG_0024

IMG_0028

Benson, Perry & Whitley London. Lightweight mohair in black with natural pinstripes. Six on two with jetted pockets and side vents.

Benson, Perry & Whitley London. Lightweight mohair in black with natural pinstripes. Six on two with jetted pockets and side vents.

IMG_0046

IMG_0043 IMG_0042

IMG_0169

Anderson & Sheppard London, 1987. Six on two overcoat in gray twill.

IMG_0172 IMG_0164

 

IMG_0194

Eduardo Aroyo Madrid, 1980’s. Slightly darker gray flannel. Six on two with flap pockets and side vents.

IMG_0201 IMG_0198

IMG_0154

Kilgour, French & Stanbury London, 1990. Navy blazer in a hard worsted flannel. Six on two with flap pockets and side vents.

IMG_0158

 

IMG_0131

Kiton Napoli, 1990’s. Lightweight 100% cashmere. Six on two double breasted with flap pockets and side vents.

IMG_0137 IMG_0132

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to DOUBLE BREASTED: GOT BELLY?

  1. Carmelo says:

    Two question:
    1-The name of the Italian tailor of the 30s double breasted is “Baruffa” or “Baratta”?
    2-In which year was made the double breasted of Benson, Perry & Whitley ?
    Many thanks.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s